We Have Extended Hours

We're open Saturdays, too!

Text or Call Us!

(480) 888-9596

Request an Appointment

Book your dream smile!

Text or Call Us!

(480) 888-9596

We Have Extended Hours

We're open Saturdays, too!

Request an Appointment

Book your dream smile!

Cleanings & Prevention

Support and surround your body with good health by remembering your regular cleanings.

A healthy smile starts with regular cleanings. Just like getting the oil changed in your car, to keep a healthy mouth, you have to get regular hygiene appointments. Our hygiene appointments are comprehensive. We don’t just look at your teeth, but also look at your gums, tongue, mouth and overall health.

We strongly encourage you to play a part in practicing good oral health by following a dental hygiene routine and working with us by asking questions about how you can improve it.

If you have a history of poor dental health, you should be coming in for your cleaning every 3-4 months. If your smile is healthy and you take very good care of your mouth (brush 2-3 times/day and floss properly) you should visit every 6 months.

If you are a new patient and are booking your appointment for the first time, please let our treatment coordination and front end staff know when the last time you had a hygiene appointment. If it’s been more than 1 year, we’ll need to spend some extra time on your visit.

During each visit, a comprehensive dental exam will be performed by your dentist at your initial visit. Your hygienist will perform the following:

 

  • Examination of diagnostic x-rays (radiographs)
  • Oral cancer screening
  • Gum disease evaluation
  • Examination of tooth decay
  • Examination of existing restorations

 

During your visit, a Registered Dental Hygienist will perform your dental cleanings, which will include:

 

  • Removal of calculus (tartar)
  • Removal of plaque
  • Teeth polishing
Fluoride is one of the most effective agents available to prevent tooth decay. It is mineral that is naturally present in almost all foods and water supplies. Many health professionals and organizations support the known benefits of fluoride.

 

Fluoride works in two ways:

 

  • Topical fluoride – We access fluoride by using dental products that contain fluorides, such as toothpaste, mouth rinses, and gels. Topical fluoride protects teeth that have already erupted by seeping into the outer surface of the tooth enamel, making teeth more resistant to decay.
  • Systemic fluoride – We access systemic fluoride from most foods and water supplies. It is also available as a supplement in drop or gel form and can be prescribed by your dentist or physician.  Systemic fluoride protects teeth that have already erupted and teeth that are still developing under the gum’s surface.

 

Most people receive fluoride from food and water but sometimes it is not enough to help prevent decay. Your dentist or dental hygienist may recommend the use of home and/or professional fluoride treatments for the following reasons:

 

  • Deep pits and fissures on the chewing surfaces
  • Exposed and sensitive root surfaces
  • Fair to poor oral hygiene habits
  • Frequent sugar and carbohydrate intake
  • Inadequate exposure to fluorides
  • Inadequate saliva flow due to medical conditions, medical treatments or medications
  • History of dental decay
How you take care of your teeth at home contributes greatly to the overall health of your teeth and gums. We want to help you achieve the goal of a beautiful, healthy smile that lasts a lifetime. Important factors in your oral health include a balanced diet, reducing the number of snacks you eat and using the various dental aids provided to control the plaque and bacteria that cause dental disease.
  • Tooth brushing – It’s important to brush your teeth twice a day (especially before going to bed at night) with an ADA-approved soft bristle brush and toothpaste
  • Flossing – Daily flossing is the best way to clean between your teeth and under the gumline. Flossing regularly also disrupts plaque colonies from building up, preventing damage to the gums, teeth, and bone.
  • Rinsing – After every meal or snack, you should rinse your mouth with water if unable to brush.
Brushing
  • Place the brush at a 45-degree angle to the gums and gently brush using a small, circular motion, ensuring that you always feel the bristles on the gums
  • Brush the outer, inner, and biting surfaces of each tooth
  • Use the tip of the brush to clean the inside of the front teeth
  • Brush your tongue to remove bacteria and freshen your breath.
Flossing
  • Take 12-16 inches (30-40cm) of dental floss and wrap it around your middle fingers, leaving about 2 inches (5cm) of floss between the hands
  • Using your thumbs and forefingers to guide the floss, gently insert the floss between teeth using a sawing motion.
  • Curve the floss into a “C” shape around each tooth and under the gumline.  Gently move the floss up and down, cleaning the side of each tooth.
According to the American Cancer Society’s research, there are more than 30,000 cases of oral cancer diagnosed each year. More than 7,000 of those cases result in the death of a patient. Oral cancer can easily be diagnosed with an annual oral cancer exam and effectively treated when caught in its earliest stages.
The most common type of oral cancer is the malignant squamous cell carcinoma and it usually originates in lip and mouth tissues and begins with an asymptomatic stage during which the usual cancer signs may not be noticeable.
Oral cancers occur in many different places in the oral cavity and maxillofacial region, including:
  • Lips
  • Mouth
  • Tongue
  • Salivary Glands
  • Oropharyngeal Region (throat)
  • Gums
  • Face
Our dental professionals are trained to look for any noticeable abnormalities, some of which include:
  • Red patches and sores
  • Leukoplakia
  • Lumps
    • Dental Flosses – A nylon filament or polyethylene ribbon that comes in a variety of flavors helps remove food particles and plaque from between teeth and below the gum.

 

    • Interdental Cleaners – Tiny brushes that are gentle on the gums and effective in cleaning the contours of teeth and between gums. Use in addition to dental floss.

 

    • Mouth Rinses – Cosmetic rinses typically only suppress bad breath but therapeutic rinses contain active ingredients that help reduce bad breath, plaque, and cavities. Use after brushing.

 

    • Oral Irrigators – Water is continuously sprayed from tiny jets into the gum pockets to remove harmful bacteria and food particles.

 

    • Rubber Tip Simulators – An excellent tool for removing plaque around the gum line and stimulating blood flow to the gums. Trace the rubber tip gently alone the outer and inner gum line at least once a day.

 

    • Tongue Cleaners – Tongue cleaners are designed to scrape fungi and bacteria that colonize on the tongue and have been related to bad breath and many systemic diseases like diabetes, heart disease, respiratory disease and stroke. Use prior to brushing.

 

  • Toothbrushes – Dentists typically recommend electronic toothbrushes because they are typically more effective than manual brushes. The rotating head helps dislodge plaque and remove food particles from around the gums and teeth.

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At Brush Dental, we want to deliver a positive dental experience. From the moment you walk in until the end of your visit, our team works hard to keep you happy.

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Don’t let finances get in the way of seeking dental treatment! We want to ensure affordable visits for all by accepting insurance and offering flexible payment plans.